Which of the following Is a Best Practice for Updating Your Mutual Aid Agreement

Mutual Aid Agreement for Resource Sharing – VLCT developed this example of a mutual aid agreement to help cities enter into agreements with neighbouring cities to ensure that a variety of essential functions are fulfilled in difficult times. If you have any questions about this legal agreement, please contact your city`s attorney. You can access the agreement template on the VLCT website here. CMR has developed a template for a city-wide evacuation plan, which can be downloaded here (Word document). This model aims to give cities the ability to create an evacuation plan and evacuation mapping. Keep in mind that it`s crucial to talk to the largest facilities in your city, including resorts, medical facilities/clinics, schools/daycares, developments, and those who need special assistance during an evacuation. This serves to coordinate evacuation planning and set expectations in advance, so no one wonders who will do what and when. When creating your plan and assignment, consider creating a front/back document with information and assignments (see Appendix 4 of the template for an example) for residents in case an evacuation is required. The evacuation plan template provides general guidance that would be relevant to all cities before and during an evacuation, as well as to areas where cities would need to add details for their own purposes. There are eight attachments included, which must be specified for your city to be useful.

Participating countries and territories should have insurance or any other form of protection is a best practice in the preparation of mutual assistance agreements. Participating countries and territories should have insurance or any other form of protection is a best practice in the preparation of mutual assistance agreements. ERAF provides state funding to complement FEMA`s public assistance after state-declared disasters. Eligible public costs are reimbursed by federal taxpayers at 75%. The state contributes in part to the required non-federal compliance of 25% for approved projects, based on the cities` ERAF compliance level. Cities must meet four basic measures to get a 12.5% agreement from the state. Cities with higher standards can get a higher percentage of government funding for post-disaster repair projects – from 12.5% to 17.5%. Cities that have not adopted the basic package of measures will receive a reduced state correspondence of 7.5%.

As a result, the government`s contribution to the local compliance requirement ranges from 7.5% to 17.5% of the total project cost, depending on the degree of adoption of the recommended mitigation measures. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it! for questions and help to maximize your ERAF condition match. These roundtables are designed to give EMRs and fire chiefs the opportunity to share skills, learn from each other, learn about new and emerging topics in emergency management, network and get direct feedback from their peers on the issues they face in their roles or cities. Please encourage EMRs and fire chiefs in your city to join us, or ask for their experience if they have already done so. If you are an EMD or fire chief interested and would like to know more, please contact Alyssa at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it! or 802-257-4547 ext. 113.

For the purposes of mutual assistance, local authorities leading the recovery process are encouraged to maintain a list of officials who have gained experience and expertise at this stage so that advice and assistance can be made available to other disaster recovery authorities. Self-help arrangements are a proven method that saves time and effort during stressful times during and after dangerous events. We encourage cities to work with their neighbours and develop agreements that make sense for their situation. Here are some models or starting points for self-help: it focuses on the issue of mutual aid in human resources and offers practical advice on many issues that have so far often been seen as obstacles to the success of agreements – terms and conditions of employment, health and safety issues, insurance responsibilities and legal powers. There are several options for cities interested in updating their flood risk ordinances. WrC has developed model flood and river erosion risk regulations for cities that have different zoning bylaws (click here) and a version for cities without other zoning bylaws (click here). You will see this in the cmr standard statutes, where optional components and choices between stress levels are clearly indicated. These are some of the decisions that need to be made when adapting the model to the needs of your city. In addition, Vermont ANR has a customizable model law.

Cities can also develop their own bylaws as long as they meet the standards of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If you have river corridor regulations in your bylaws, your city may be eligible for a 17.5% increased compliance with the State Emergency Assistance Fund (ERAF) as long as you previously meet the 12.5% ERAF criteria. Not sure what your city`s ERAF rate is or what ERAF criteria have been met? Visit the FloodReady website. LOUIS N. MOLINO SR. has been an emergency service provider for over 35 years. During this time, he held a variety of positions including Firefighter, Emergency Physician, Fire and Emergency Medical Dispatcher, Fire and Rescue Services (EMS) Instructor, Paramedic, Fire and EMS Training Officer, Fire and EMS Safety Officer, Fire and EMS Safety Officer, Incident Safety Officer, hazardous materials technician and HAZMAT team member. He also served as Base Liaison Officer, Captain, Battalion Chief and Deputy Chief of Mutual Aid Emergency Services, Inc. (MAES), which provides EMS services at Fort Dix and McGuire Air Force Base. If an evacuation plan and mapping have already been developed in your city, please inform Alyssa.

Also, take the opportunity to review and update your current plan. Does your plan include the elements of the attached template? Have you recently spoken to institutions and stakeholders in your city and coordinated evacuation planning expectations? Have you developed an evacuation map and shared it with your residents so that they can be informed of this issue? Here are some considerations to consider when reviewing your current evacuation planning efforts. LEMP Templates – There are several templates in the Local Emergency Management Plan attachments. Appendix B4 is a list of mutual assistance, Appendix B5 is a list of resources to include those with letters of intent or mutual assistance, Appendix D2 is a mutual assistance policy for police services, and there is also a Vermont Model Memorandum of Understanding. These are all available in a customizable format to vem.vermont.gov/plans/local. The Flood Guide contains the actions and steps to be followed by each role at each stage: from proactive and intelligent pre-preparedness to advanced preparations when a severe storm is forecast, to actions to be taken during the storm and during recovery. This comprehensive guide is designed to be an active tool that is kept both electronically and in paper form with your local emergency management plan. Many state and federal authorities were involved in the preparation of the flood guide. Our goal is for cities to share this guide both internally and with their neighboring cities to promote resilience throughout Vermont. This brochure provides an overview of RMC`s emergency management work. This website should be considered a source of useful information and materials to guide emergency planning in your city.

Questions about contingency planning should be directed to Alyssa Sabetto at 257-4547 ext. 113 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it! Mutual Intervention and Community Support Toolkit – This toolkit is hosted by the Vermont Council and Rural Developent as a best practice guide for building local self-help networks. It is a living document developed in collaboration with Community Resilience Organizations, Community Workshop, the Northeast Kingdom Collaborative, Space on Main and the Vermont Council on Rural Development. The toolkit is available on the VCRD website here. A risk mitigation plan is a tool for organizing ideas and developing strategies to implement mitigation measures in your city. This translates into fewer post-disaster losses, recovery times and costs for the city and its residents. More information on risk mitigation planning can be found in this information overview. To find out what your city has done in terms of mitigation planning, please contact Alyssa Sabetto at (802) 257-4547 ext. 113 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it! Below is a best practice for updating your mutual assistance agreement: Check with your national or local emergency management association for up-to-date data on hazard identification and vulnerability assessment.

This answer was confirmed as correct and useful. Roles and responsibilities are information about who can activate the mutual aid agreement usually found. Roles and responsibilities are information about who can activate the mutual aid agreement usually found. Starting in 2022, there will be new Level II reporting requirements for Vermont. The Windham Regional Commission no longer accepts Level II reports for CEPA 6, which has been dissolved. There is now a national LEPC to accept reports. .